Album Review: Timbre- Sun & Moon

Review by Sean Lynch

RIYL: Jack White, Owen Pallett and Anathallo S.Carey

Song Recommendations: “You Hands Hold Home,” “The Persistence of First Love” and “Chicago Pier”

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In a time where classical music elements are beginning to be traded in for electric instruments and sound, Timbre shows that we can have the best of both worlds on her new album Sun & Moon. Timbre has worked as harp player on many artists’ albums, including Jack White’s Lazaretto. Timbre uses a mixture of her angelic voice, synthesizer and harp to create an interesting combination of old and new elements.

“The Persistence of First Love” is a song that capitalizes on the use of synths as the backup for Timbre’s vocals. It was unusual at first because most of the songs have a presence of the harp. Timbre’s powerful emotion-driven vocals roll on throughout the song and create a beautiful sound.

“Chicago Pier” offers multiple changes in the tempo of the song. The beginning starts out slow with the harp and violin playing slow and gently. The middle of the song is where the song picks up the most steam because the synth comes in and brings the song into present day. The violin and the harp pick up the pace and match and the synth. The song offers a great combination of instruments and the change in tempo from some of the other slower songs on the albums.

“You Hands Hold Home” is a song that also cashes in on the combination of classical instruments and synthesizers. The harp and Timbre’s voice dance a beautiful waltz together. Each sound is choreographed and makes for the perfect layout to the song.

Timbre is giving life to a dying form of music. The music industry does not focus on the classical artists anymore, but Timbre is making them pay attention with her use of current music elements. Timbre is an extremely versatile performer. The use of her beautiful voice and gentle harp-strumming ring out throughout Sun & Moon creating an amazing sound and helping revive some aspects of classical music with a modern twist.

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Posted on April 10, 2015, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Interesting review but one thing needs to be clarified, there are absolutely no synthesizers used in this double album. How do I know? I direct both the symphony orchestra and the Trevecca Madrigalians which provide all the support background… and happen to be Timbre’s dad!

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